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Apple 'avoiding billions of dollars in taxes'

New York, April 30, 2012

Gadget giant Apple is avoiding billions of dollars in taxes by setting up small offices around the world to collect and invest the company's profits, The New York Times reported yesterday.

The report said an office in Reno, Nevada, where the corporate tax rate is zero, was one of many that the California-based technology giant uses to legally sidestep state income taxes on some of its gains. California's corporate tax rate is 8.84 per cent.

Record sales of iPhones and iPad tablet computers, particularly in China and other parts of Asia, saw Apple report last week that it made a $39.2 billion profit in the quarter ended March 31.

The Times quoted Apple executives who said the Reno office and others in Ireland, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, the British Virgin Islands and other low-tax places were among the legal methods the company was using to reduce its global tax bill.

The newspaper said Apple had 'devised corporate strategies that take advantage of gaps in the tax code,' citing former executives who had helped craft those policies.

In Reno, Apple uses a subsidiary named Braeburn Capital to manage and invest the gadget company's money, the report said, and when those investments succeed, the Nevada address shields the profits from being subjected to tax.

Former executive Robert Hatta, who oversaw Apple's iTunes retail marketing and sales for European markets until 2007, said routing transactions through Luxembourg allowed them to be taxed at low rates.

'We set up in Luxembourg because of the favourable taxes,' Hatta told the Times.




Tags: Apple | taxes | dollars |

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