Friday 28 November 2014
 
»
 
»
Story

Libyan oil 'can be back in days'

London, October 2, 2013

Libya's oil exports could return to full capacity in days once strikes in the restive east end, its oil minister said on Wednesday.
 
But demands for more local power from some protesters are tied to the political transition and may take time to resolve, Abdelbari Arusi added.
 
To keep international oil companies on board through the turmoil, Arusi said Libya was already working on improving terms for existing investors and easing terms in new license rounds.
 
"We're expecting to solve this issue any time and by solving this issue we can have oil production back to 1.6 million barrels per day," he told a conference. "Our problem in Libya now is a political problem, not a technical problem."
 
A mix of striking workers, militias and political activists have blocked Libya's oilfields and ports for more than two months resulting, according to Arusi, in over $5 billion of lost revenues for the Opec member whose budget relies on oil exports.
 
Libya took its first steps towards resuming output from the west in mid-September after reaching a deal with locals.
 
Arusi said a parliamentary committee was negotiating with groups in the east and only a small number of protesters were still holding out. Because it is the ports not the fields that are blocked in the east, he added, production could return to capacity in three to four days once disputes are settled.
 
Talks to reopen the major oil export terminals of Es Sider and Ras Lanuf in the east have taken time because while some protesters are simply demanding better benefits, more local investment and more jobs, others have linked their demands to political wrangling over the future shape of Libya.
 
Protesters in the east want a federal Libya with greater powers and the headquarters of the National Oil Company (NOC) transferred to Benghazi, the capital of the east and birthplace of the 2011 revolution that removed Muammar Gaddafi from power.
 
Parliament is due to write a new constitution for the new Libya but different groups are pushing their own agendas. The government lacks the military means to crush armed protesters and in any case, Arusi said it was reluctant to use force as it sought to build a new democracy.
 
"Some in Ajdabiya, Brega and Ras Lanuf are asking to form a federal system and if you like that then you have to put it in the constitution," Arusi said. "We are working on the constitution."
 
OUTPUT INCHING UP
 
Growing instability since 2011 coupled with disruptions and, in some cases, disappointing finds have prompted some majors including ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell to freeze activities and smaller firms like Marathon are selling.
 
Arusi said Libya was reviewing the terms for existing foreign investors in its energy sector as well as drawing up more attractive terms for its next licensing round, which he said should be launched in the first half of next year.
 
A new petroleum law would also be ready next year, he added. - Reuters



Tags: Oil | libya | strike |

More Energy, Oil & Gas Stories

calendarCalendar of Events

Ads